Elizabeth Holmes’ trial over fraud charges ends after defense admits they did not have a case

Monday was the last day of the Defense’s case in Elizabeth Holmes’ trial, which began on March 4 in Palo Alto, California. Yesterday, Dr. David Hawkins, a Harvard Medical School professor, testified about a…

Elizabeth Holmes’ trial over fraud charges ends after defense admits they did not have a case

Monday was the last day of the Defense’s case in Elizabeth Holmes’ trial, which began on March 4 in Palo Alto, California. Yesterday, Dr. David Hawkins, a Harvard Medical School professor, testified about a 2012 meeting he had with her at Stanford University, during which she pitched her plan to manufacture non-invasive blood tests for biomarkers of cancer. At one point, Hawkins questioned her about a piece of old financial correspondence about her Rely on Customers program, a nonprofit entity he says he was unaware of and that Holmes maintained despite a few payments to it in previous years. Holmes vehemently denied any connection between her and the group.

Noting the procedural steps lawyers must take when they’re closing their case, Judge Ann Troy acknowledged the significance of these two pieces of evidence for the jury in order to let the defense know they were going to be allowed to use them at trial. She said that she was ready to dismiss the case if they could find proof that Holmes had not misled investors about the purposes of Rely on Customers or that she purposely misled investors by not disclosing details of the nonprofit group in her public financial disclosures. Holmes’ defense team then objected to Hawkins’ testimony on the grounds that his agreement with Rely on Customers had a confidentiality provision that bound him to “lethally and aggressively defend” the program against claims it had been misused. The judge then granted the defense’s request and dismissed the case.

Read the full story at The New York Times.

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