‘It’s Your Right To Change Your Child’s Diagnosis:’ ‘Daily Show’ Faces Off With Anti-Vaxxers on CDC Conspiracy

The satirical news show “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” visited Seattle and Texas to face off against anti-vaxxers who spent their time defending the practice of vaccines as the cure to society’s ills….

‘It’s Your Right To Change Your Child’s Diagnosis:’ ‘Daily Show’ Faces Off With Anti-Vaxxers on CDC Conspiracy

The satirical news show “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah” visited Seattle and Texas to face off against anti-vaxxers who spent their time defending the practice of vaccines as the cure to society’s ills.

Jeremy Bannon, a correspondent for the show, spent several weeks asking question to people who believe vaccines are harmful to both the health of children and the general society. The pushback Bannon received was total and unabashed.

On first, he had the opportunity to sit down with Jamie Mermilland, a mother and vaccine skeptic from Washington state who claims that vaccinations cause autism. Mermilland explained the reasons why the MMR vaccine which can cause mumps, rubella and varicella, has never been associated with autism. She says several studies that support her stand have been suppressed.

Mermilland refused to answer a simple question about the number of children who die from vaccines each year, citing a child’s skin color as being a major factor.

“Just because it’s harder to know the statistics on a race like this, doesn’t mean there isn’t a problem,” Mermilland said.

One part of her response angered Newsweek columnist, Joan Walsh who came to confront Mermilland on live television.

“It was just astounding to watch her see me on television,” Walsh said. “You know what Jamie? Let me get something straight right now. I know somebody who got mumps and died.”

“Me too. Why did they make me sick?” Mermilland asked.

Jenna McCarthy, a mother of two from the Dallas-Fort Worth area defended the necessity of childhood vaccines. She said she hadn’t researched the link between vaccines and autism prior to her son’s sudden onset of motor problems.

“Those are issues that need to be addressed with the research,” McCarthy said. “I understand the fears that you have, but I’m gonna say yes.”

Moving on to Texas, Bannon visited with Ruth Cannon, a licensed professional counselor who practiced child development for over 45 years.

Cannon stressed the importance of including children’s intellectual and learning abilities as part of the equation when it comes to the day-to-day routine.

“It’s just not my responsibility to educate a seven-year-old, it’s just not my responsibility to educate a four-year-old,” Cannon said. “There are other people in the world who I can and I should be educating.”

When Bannon asked Cannon why scientists can identify a link between vaccinations and autism but not show it on medical charts and instead make it out to be a parent’s paranoia, Cannon said she didn’t care about the scientific data.

“If you think your child has autism, if you feel like it’s something, that’s your right to change that diagnosis,” Cannon said. “Sometimes a person wants to go the extra mile to get somewhere.”

This wasn’t the only time a politically incorrect remark was used to the group’s detriment. After one of the doctors laughed at the testimony given by Kate Wolfe, a home school teacher from Texas who alleged that the CDC made it up to get parents to buy MMR vaccines for their children, Fox News anchor Shepard Smith decided to take a stand.

“I think that’s hilarious and offensive and I apologize that she couldn’t take this up with me,” Wolfe said.

“That was actually my reason for the measles outbreak in Disneyland, was our over concern for vaccinating our children,” Smith said. “I mean, that should be the theme tonight if this is all they want to talk about.”

Watch the ridiculousness below.

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