Luxury activities in Sicily

There are many advantages that come with living in Sicily. The island is absolutely beautiful: stunning scenery, superb sites for sightseeing, a people who speak all the local languages, and being all that, is…

Luxury activities in Sicily

There are many advantages that come with living in Sicily. The island is absolutely beautiful: stunning scenery, superb sites for sightseeing, a people who speak all the local languages, and being all that, is surrounded by international golf courses.

These aren’t play-as-you-swallow courses either, but European links courses overseen by the Champions Golf Federation (SGF), which attracts people from all over the world.

In the area surrounding Palermo, famous for its historic centre and the great basilicas of the San Ferdinando and St John Lateran, the Italian Olympic golf team has been busy at their training camp, just ten miles or so from the coast.

At the centre of things is golf ace Mario Monti, also the head chef for Sicily and the base manager for the Italian Golf Federation. If there was any doubt about his passion for the game, he’s proven it by devoting himself to the project completely, building the five star training centre and hotel, and managing the life of the island which so impresses him.

Just off the coast, the Oceanside Hotel is hosting an incredible week’s golf programme.

To begin your visit, be sure to stop off at the Cruyffin Museum in Palermo. Invented in 1930, the Cruyffin is a big bronze circle carved in stone, made out of about 10,000 tiny conical pistachio nuts. The only things on the surface are the sculptor’s wife and himself, but inside is a small piece of wood with a brass key to unlock the “craag”.

Museum volunteer Bruno Capoccia has taken me inside to show me the hundreds of different implements which are used to turn this small piece of wood into this extraordinary sculpture.

There is another museum in the city which deserves a visit, the Agritourism Centre’s Springfield Center. Their well-established history dates back to the 15th century, and for generations of Sicily’s great, great ancestors this agritourism scheme was a popular way of saving the sea-lion.

Down the coast another ten miles or so, on the shore of the Amalfi coast, lies the famous Galley of the Bay. This course was played until 1959, although, fortunately for locals and visitors, it has since been restored and, as you walk around on the beach, enjoying the gentle, gentleness of the seaside, this takes you to the charming orange seaside village of Paniagua where you can rent a beach chair, and a drink, from one of the hundreds of vendors.

I never thought I’d get that chance, and it seems like everyone loves this magical part of the world and the many diverse tourism alternatives.

Don’t miss the chance to visit the Sanctuary of Saint Peter and Saint Joseph on the island of Ragusa. This is a mystical site in a charming village where I spent my honeymoon, and is a link to the holy place next door in nearby Assisi.

Here you’ll find the Sistine Chapel which was designed by Michelangelo and cut into the stone wall of the church to form the front entrance. Perfect for a photo op too.

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