Marilyn Mosby vows to be more transparent with how she spends Baltimore’s $16 million a year on child abuse cases

The head of Baltimore’s Office of State’s Attorney promised Friday to be more transparent about how the $16 million they spend every year to handle child abuse cases is spent, one day after prosecutors…

Marilyn Mosby vows to be more transparent with how she spends Baltimore’s $16 million a year on child abuse cases

The head of Baltimore’s Office of State’s Attorney promised Friday to be more transparent about how the $16 million they spend every year to handle child abuse cases is spent, one day after prosecutors accused the organization of “utter dysfunction.”

Speaking at the Baltimore Examiner’s annual media summit, State’s Attorney Marilyn Mosby said to be “not a faceless organisation.” She addressed allegations aired in internal emails from last month in which prosecutors said their staff was unfairly promoted and they were not notified about cases. Her office handles about 6,600 cases a year, including many against children and adult defendants, some of whom do not have lawyers.

“I can tell you that the first year I was in office the budget did not add up and the second year, the budget has been more stable and almost on time every year,” Mosby said. “We don’t need to be doing this every year and going as fast as we are, but what we must do is make sure that we’re providing the resources so that cases can be properly and expeditiously dealt with by our investigators.”

Mosby said she was disturbed by the morale of prosecutors that has been revealed in the email exchange. She said in the story that she saw tears from her lawyers as she read the emails.

“I saw anger and mistrust, I saw a lot of frustration and I saw a lot of disbelief,” she said. “What I also saw was a decision made among a lot of people. When you hear the cry that there were tears shed, sometimes our work can be misunderstood.”

She spoke about her relationship with the organization’s top prosecutor, Marilyn Mosby’s chief of staff, Justin Stewart, who she said expressed concern about “the health and safety” of her staff.

She added that her office does not ask questions about cases before they are brought to court. Mosby said the office’s work is never finished — even if they have a child abuse case in some case, they can and do seek prosecutors to take on other cases.

“So if we have a situation where a child is being sexually abused, the child is killed, the child is abused, or even the child is taken and beaten or neglected — even before we get to the appropriate charging and arresting levels — we still need to be evaluating this case,” she said.

The director of a recent Sun report on the payments to prosecutors, which Mosby ordered her staff to review, had this to say: “The United States of America is a democracy and that democracy requires the preservation of the separation of powers between our executive, legislative and judicial branches. I’m not concerned, but I’m shocked.”

Mosby last month decided not to file criminal charges against four officers involved in the death of Freddie Gray, a black man who died in April 2015 after being injured while in police custody.

In response to the Sun’s report, Mosby sent out a directive that she said was meant to assure prosecutors she would hold her people accountable if she believed they had not performed their jobs correctly.

“What I’m trying to get across and what I’m sure some of the lawyers here are so curious about is that I see our investigators as we see our attorneys — as people, as professionals and people who are doing a good job,” she said. “Like any profession, you have people who do a good job, people who do a very good job and people who don’t do a very good job.”

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