Missing Chinese tennis player lost passport in apartment in New York

Ms. Peng Shuai, a missing member of the Chinese women’s tennis team, was listed as an email provider and her passport was found in an apartment last week in New York, according to reports….

Missing Chinese tennis player lost passport in apartment in New York

Ms. Peng Shuai, a missing member of the Chinese women’s tennis team, was listed as an email provider and her passport was found in an apartment last week in New York, according to reports.

Her sudden disappearance has rocked Chinese fans. Ms. Peng had been close to becoming the first Chinese tennis player to make the round of 16 at Wimbledon since 1997. On Monday morning, Ms. Peng appeared to have disappeared after posting a cryptic message on Weibo to her account, which has less than 150,000 followers. Ms. Peng, who was ranked ninth in the world, had been playing in the second round of the Eastbourne tournament before she was reported missing.

“All my belongings are missing from my house, and my passport is missing. For days now I have been shouting for help,” she wrote. “I believe the world’s greatest team of professionals are desperate to know if the player is alive. If not, then please still find me and help me. I will endure any pain.”

When reached by The Daily Mail on Monday, her mother said Ms. Peng was back in Shanghai and in a safe place.

“She returned home,” Ms. Lei said. “She is OK. We need to let the police complete their investigation first. We don’t have much information and Chinese newspapers haven’t interviewed us.”

A spokesman for the Metropolitan Police said: “We were called to an address in south London on Monday to reports of an Asian woman believed to be aged 30. A 30-year-old woman was found to be in possession of a passport and who was in possession of other items including jewellery. No arrests have been made at this stage.”

Among those who have circulated an email showing Ms. Peng’s data being used was Angela Hirst, a sports columnist with The Independent. Ms. Hirst said she first came across the email — which she has not identified — on Saturday when she was asked to circulate a piece by former British tennis star John Lloyd.

“I put the name out on Twitter, and people began to see it and dig a little deeper,” she said. “People started asking who in China was she communicating with. When one of her email contacts said she could send in emails to newspapers, people put her photo next to it and began to wonder why she was missing.”

For Ms. Hirst, this was a chance to play a little detective. She said she learned of Ms. Peng’s last match on Thursday when a play at Wimbledon this summer was postponed. “There is this whole baggage of ‘old lady in tennis,’ she thought,” Ms. Hirst said. “Because, after all, Wimbledon is only a few months away.

The day after she had disappeared, Ms. Peng tweeted that she was surprised by her sudden disappearance.

“Hope I’m found alive soon … as I don’t feel fear and am optimistic for my life,” she wrote.

Read the full story at The Telegraph.

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