The 7 face-saving hypocrisies of right-wing extremists

During the MSNBC debate Tucker Carlson attacked African immigrants and said: “the ‘many haters’ crowd, among whom I do belong, is frightening.” This is a false narrative we’ve seen time and time again with…

The 7 face-saving hypocrisies of right-wing extremists

During the MSNBC debate Tucker Carlson attacked African immigrants and said: “the ‘many haters’ crowd, among whom I do belong, is frightening.” This is a false narrative we’ve seen time and time again with the way he tries to hide his bigotry behind false “interests” and “moral superiority.” He also touted how his life is made easier in “elite” media environments. How? By hiding behind his past helping Hitler, and having a history of passing on anti-Semitic material to anti-Semites, as well as his identity as a bigoted war propagandist from the far right. The line that Carlson walks between what is acceptable and what is not at times doesn’t come close to explaining his extremist views. Just recently in an episode that aired in March, Carlson caused controversy for a segment calling on immigrants to “take our jobs” and for falsely claiming that President Barack Obama wanted to send over 8 million Americans “to work in Muslim countries.” Though Carlson’s profile skyrocketed in the last year in part due to Tucker Carlson Tonight, which was a reflection of a media environment in which more people are getting their news and opinions from their alternative news channels, he is just one part of a far-right media apparatus that has grown even larger in the past year. In fact, The Blaze, the far-right media company he co-founded in 2012, has become increasingly popular with ratings up 165 percent this year, thanks in part to his success.

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