Wind storm blamed for power outages in Canada

Image copyright Today’s news Image caption Emergency workers are still in Windsor, Ontario, looking for people whose homes might have been damaged More than 80,000 customers in Ontario are still without power a day…

Wind storm blamed for power outages in Canada

Image copyright Today’s news Image caption Emergency workers are still in Windsor, Ontario, looking for people whose homes might have been damaged

More than 80,000 customers in Ontario are still without power a day after wind storms hammered the region, the province’s electrical power company says.

Hydro One said the wind gusts hit 160km/h (100mph) in some areas, including Windsor, where extensive damage to the rail network and damaged roads has led to grid outages.

The Canadian government has declared a state of emergency as wind speeds reached 143km/h (87mph).

Emergency workers are still looking for people whose homes might have been damaged by the high winds.

Quebec, Minnesota and Wisconsin were also hit by storms that caused property damage.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Tuesday’s hurricane, named Florence, is due to hit the US east coast at the weekend

A number of Canadian rail lines have been hit by gusts of more than 160km/h, said a spokesman for the Canadian National Railway.

Winds have also knocked out power to a section of the Canadian Pacific train line along the Queen Elizabeth Way in Western Quebec.

“We are working around the clock to restore power to as many as possible,” said interim CEO Stephen Wetmore.

He added that some areas of Windsor remained without power and about 25,000 homes in Toronto have been affected by outages.

Local media reports say that water levels along Lake Erie in Ontario rose as high as 30m (98ft) above normal as a result of the storm.

An aircraft carrier sailed into Detroit Metropolitan Airport to deliver oil to the area, US officials said.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption The Cape Cod Fair Grounds saw winds of more than 140km/h

Across the United States, both North Carolina and South Carolina declared states of emergency on Tuesday because of potential impacts from Hurricane Florence.

Florence, which is expected to make landfall on the US east coast later this week, is forecast to bring 140km/h (87mph) winds to North Carolina, as well as up to 100mm (4 inches) of rain.

The area around the coast already has a mix of tropical and non-tropical weather, including powerful rainstorms, hurricane-force winds and cooler ocean temperatures, according to CFSN-E, a weather-tracking group.

Florence is expected to be downgraded to a tropical storm as it comes close to land.

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