You’ll Be Chilling in the Underground Metro in Copenhagen – for Free

Watch Denmark’s busy rail system in action. When regular, inexpensive public transportation in Copenhagen is congested, what about an underground Metro that’s completely free of charge? Thanks to a new four-station Subway Extension, commuters…

You’ll Be Chilling in the Underground Metro in Copenhagen – for Free

Watch Denmark’s busy rail system in action.

When regular, inexpensive public transportation in Copenhagen is congested, what about an underground Metro that’s completely free of charge?

Thanks to a new four-station Subway Extension, commuters in the Danish capital will have access to over 220 million feet of track. The Copenhagen Metro Extension project has been under construction since November 2018, and works are expected to be complete in May 2019. According to CNN, passengers will get to enjoy free service between Copenhagen’s largest stops, Middelstern and Christianshavn, for the duration of the construction project.

The four stations, Laddam, Hoersten, Iver and Teresberg, are within a three-minute walk of each other. As of February 2019, the entire metro’s extension is just 70 miles from its original 250 mile base, and traveling from Hoersten to Teresberg requires only 27 minutes of traveling time.

Under the Metro Extension’s original $360 million budget, construction costs are estimated to reach $150 million after insurance, interest and administrative costs are taken into account. The Copenhagen Metro Corporation, the government agency responsible for construction of the project, has a capital budget of $8.3 billion and 7 million daily boardings.

According to The Washington Post, the Copenhagen Metro ended up getting a $20 million investment from the Danish government, much of which will go toward public education. “Nobody knows where they’re going to get that much from,” Edda Haug, an economics professor at the University of Copenhagen, told the Post.

“We are very proud and very pleased that the extension project has achieved fast completion,” Denmark’s transport minister, Mette Leitersen, said in a press release.

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